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When you are recovering from addiction in an IOP program or PHP program the Easter holiday can stir up a lot of emotions. It’s a chance to reconnect with family and friends, but you may also have to manage a lot of stress and triggers that test your sobriety.

Being able to socialize with loved ones during holidays is a big step forward in recovery. In our center for rehab in Dallas, TX we take extra steps during the Easter season to prepare patients so they can enjoy the celebration instead of being stressed out. Below is advice that we’ve found to be effective for Easter celebrations when you or a loved one is going through addiction recovery.

Focus on What the Easter Season is Really About

Egg hunts and cookouts are fun, but Easter is a spring holiday in Christian religion that’s really about rebirth, renewal and redemption. The holiday celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ after being crucified. There are a lot of parallels between Jesus’ experience and recovering from an addiction. Focusing on the concept of resurrection and redemption can help you remain resolved throughout the celebrations even when triggers and temptations are right in front of you.  

Watch Out for People Who Are Overindulging After Lent

For many Christian churches, Easter comes at the end of Lent. People often give up vices like drinking alcohol during Lent. That can lead to a lot of overindulgence during Easter celebrations. If you know this is the case for a family member or friend it may be best to minimize interaction during the Easter season to avoid possible triggers. Plus, loved ones that are overindulging are also more likely to forget you’re in recovery and may even offer you alcohol.

Stick to Daytime Celebrations

It’s always a good idea to celebrate holidays during daytime events when people are less likely to be consuming alcohol or partaking in recreational drugs. Easter is a great holiday in recovery because it’s mostly daytime activities like picnics, egg hunts and going to church. 

Help Out During the Easter Holiday

The old saying goes, idle hands are the devil’s workshop. In other words, keep yourself busy with productive tasks and you’re less likely to take part in vices and things that lead to trouble. Fortunately, there are lots of ways that someone in an IOP program can get involved during the Easter season.

Make eggs for a hunt, put together Easter baskets, host a lunch for your family or offer to help another family member if they’re hosting. The point is to get in the holiday spirit by staying productive. 

Talk to the Easter Holiday Host in Advance

Did a family member or close friend invite you to an Easter event? It may be best to talk with the host in advance about whether alcohol will be served. If alcohol is going to be served you may want to consider forgoing the event or stopping by for a short while right when the festivities start and before people begin drinking. 

And if there’s someone you know will be a negative influence you may want to also ask if they’ll be in attendance. If you feel like the stress of having to interact with the person will test your sobriety it may be best to skip the event and do something one-on-one with the host to celebrate the Easter season.

Bring Your Favorite Alcohol Substitute

You won’t feel like you’re missing out on the festivities if you have your favorite non-alcoholic beverage to enjoy. You could also try it with a holiday twist for the special occasion and make enough for everyone at the party. 

Getting through the Easter season will probably have highs and a few lows. IOP recovery in Dallas is possible any time of year with help from trained professionals that are experienced in addiction treatment. At Lighthouse Recovery we begin with an in-depth assessment to create a customer treatment plan that addresses your specific needs. Call our treatment center or schedule a free consultation online to take the first step.

Learn more about our services or contact us below to discover how Lighthouse can help you on your road to recovery today. Thank you for your trust.